National Exit Examination (NEXT) is currently a proposed amendment to be brought in the form of a test that will be regulated at final year MBBS level for all the MBBS enrolled students in India. It is currently proposed under the National Commission Medical Bill (NMC). NEXT for MBBS is believed to be designed in order to assess the basic skills and knowledge of a medical student. It will serve as a licentiate examination, clearing which will promote meritorious students for medical practise post MBBS. As believed by many senior medical authorities of India, implementation of the same is expected to be done within a stipulated period of 3 years from the day of the pass of NMC Bill. Candidates need not worry with the sanctity of official information regarding NEXT. Relevant information like what will be the changes to be brought in once NEXT is implemented, how will it affect the Foreign National Students, what will the exam mainly be about and so from our page.


What is NEXT?

The foremost thing that any medical aspirant in his / her final year of MBBS should know is what exactly is NEXT. Being acquainted with the very basic of the exam will help eradicate the fuss that has been entailing since the Ministry of Health, India, made the concerned announcement. The exit examination- NEXT is supposed to enhance the quality intake of MBBS graduates willing to pursue their medical career in postgraduate courses. It is currently being projected with the sole aim of attaining refine medical graduates.

NEXT, more commonly known as National Exit Examination at MBBS Level, will be an all India level based exam designed to judge the overall knowledge gained and practical understanding developed by MBBS enrolled medical students. It is expected that NEXT will extensively assess and evaluate the final year MBBS students’ overall skills in terms of regulation of practicing in different fields at the MBBS level. As opposed to the different MBBS exams conducted by various MBBS colleges, the NEXT  exam might extensively be based on Multiple Choice Questions. In saying so, it is nowhere assumed and accepted that subjective structural questions will be done away from the final MBBS level exam.

Latest in NEXT

The very first amendment to the NMC bill was first put under consideration by the Lok Sabha in the month of February 2018 followed thereafter in the month of March 2018. Since then lot many profound debates have emerged amidst the medical practitioners and medical aspirants. Only recently did the Union Cabinet chaired by our Hon. Prime Minister Narendra Modi gave his final nod for the approval and passing of the NMC Bill.

An important latest update concerning NEXT is for AYUSH aspirants. Medical aspirants under AYUSH Ayurveda, Yoga and neuropathy, Yunani, Siddha, and Homeopathy, as per the latest amendments should know that the earlier proposed bridge course has been waivered off. To say, as proposed earlier, NEXT will not serve as a provision to allow AYUSH aspirants to practice modern medicine.

Here is an excerpt of the officially released press release under the Cabinet Minister decisions

NEXT (National Exit Test)   What Is NEXT? How And When Will It Be Implemented?

Another latest amendment under the NMC Bill concerning NEXT will be that illegal and quack medical practices will have to bear a jail term of up to 5 years with a chargeable fee of up to 5 lakhs. Regulation of NEXT along with the implementation of strict rules on such illegal practises will help improve the overall medical condition in India. Not only will it help achieve meritorious aspirants willing to practise, but will also do away with all those medical students who were aided not by their own knowledge and skills but by a strong monetary backing.

NEXT (National Exit Test)   What Is NEXT? How And When Will It Be Implemented?

Purpose of NEXT: An Overview

In lieu of what we have mentioned above, the purpose of NEXT as proposed will be to regulate the following changes in the face of medical study in India:

  • NEXT will implement the conceptual understanding and skills pertaining to problem-solving of final year MBBS students in a more practical aspect. That is to say, with the substitution of final year MBBS exams, held by respective MBBS universities / colleges, with one common test NEXT, more refined aspirants will be shortlisted and chosen for higher studies in the field of medical sciences in India.
  • NEXT may become a mandatory examination to be undertaken by all those Foreign Medical Graduate Exam (FMGE) aspirants in place of the very same FMGE. Up until this year, graduates who attained their graduate-level degree from outside India but wanted to continue their practice in India had to appear for FMGE. Now, with the proposed implementation of NEXT, it is expected that FMGE will be subsumed with NEXT. To elucidate further, it is believed that FMGE will be merged in with NEXT for the Foreign Graduate Degree holders so as to provide them the license to practice medicine in India post the completion of their MBBS equivalent graduate-level degree.
  • NEXT is proposed to become an examination equivalent to NEET for postgraduate medical courses across India.
  • The proposed bill is expected to regulate NEXT as an exit examination that will conduct common counselling for admission into MBBS UG level and PG level medical courses.
  • As proposed, through NEXT 50% of the seats in the postgraduate under All India Quota seats will fall under the NEXT exam clearance. This certain reservation will be made for the government medical officers.
  • In lieu of the above-said point, it is proposed that with the implementation of NEXT exit exam, candidates once clearing their MBBS examination will have to work for 3 years in a rural / tribal area. Also, post completing PG, candidates might have to work for another period of 3 years under the same construct, i.e., in remote and / or difficult areas.
  • As stated in the official notice, the screening test for foreign MBBS graduates willing to get provisional or permanent registration with Medical Council of India (MCI) or State Medical Council (SMC) in India will be eradicated. NEXT for Indian overseas candidates will serve as a screening test instead of the earlier MCI Screening Test.

NEXT Exit Exam For MBBS Offical Press Release

Why and How will NEXT be Important: Merits of NEXT?

With the implementation of the earlier proposed bill, implementation of NEXT under the NMC Bill will primarily facilitate the quality intake of medical practitioners. Under this section, we have tried to lay out a few points as to why will NEXT be important.

Removal of the dearth of medical practitioners: As per our estimation based on a few factual data, India produces roughly around 60,000 MBBS graduates annually. Considering the data, there is still a dearth of good and skilled doctors in our medical sector. As stated above, with the leg of implementation of the National Exit Examination, this scarcity of trained and professional doctors can be done away.

Uniformity in MBBS Graduates: With the onset of NEXT in the final year MBBS examination, it is believed that uniformity in terms of trained MBBS graduates can be achieved over the course of time. As is proposed, NEXT will be designed in such a way so as to test both the clinical as well as written attributes needed in any MBBS graduate.

No MCI Eligibility Screening for Foreign Graduates: It is expected that with the regulation of NEXT, foreign MBBS graduates earlier had to appear for a screening test in order to show verify their eligibility. Now, as proposed, such candidates having completed their graduation in medical science (MBBS or equivalent) might not have to appear for the lofty documentation process. Making NEET score important will help save the unnecessary step that was taken by such candidates thereby saving the overall time in their admission process.

Quality Medical Facilities in Rural Areas: As it has been proffered by under the NMC bill, NEXT for MBBS will help initiate the practise of skilled and talented doctors willing to render their services in the rural sectors. As known across India, rural sectors and remote areas are untouched by good medical services. Lives are lost at the expense of no medical facility. Imposing NEXT for MBBS with the proposal of serving a minimum of three years in the rural / remote areas of India will surely improve and provide at least the basic needed medical treatment.

Help Build an International Framework: Putting NEXT for MBBS in practise will only ensure that India follows on the path of refined international medical services. As international modules of medical mechanism are known for rendering safety of patients and an overall quality of medical services (with trained and skilled doctors), following a similar structure will ensure India gain medical recognition all the more.

NEXT Demerits

As any new implementation or change goes across India, or in any concerned thing, in the midst of merits stand a few demerits as well. As explained above in detail the purpose and overview of NEXT for MBBS, it sure has a few demerits attached to it. With the rising chaos and debate centering NEXT, here are a few demerits that we feel will not be appreciated by the likes of many:

Surge of Exploitive Coaching Centres: With the onset of NEXT for MBBS in the final year, candidates who would want to seek further studies might prefer to join coachings and classes they feel will enhance their preparation. This will only act as providing unnecessary fodder to a few exploitive coaching centres that will squeeze surging money in the name of NEXT for MBBS.

Increased Years: As stated above, NEXT  might regulate the minimum 3-year service in remote and rural areas post-graduation. What we fear is, doing so might increase the total number of years that is currently needed in order to become a refined doctor with MD / MS degree. This is vastly being contested by many medical aspirants all over India.

Maintaining a Standardized Exam: We all have been witness to any change in lieu of improvements brought in the history of India. What entails is a series of debate, unnecessary conflicts amidst the very ruling government and the opposition parties. In the heat of all of this, it becomes difficult to flourish the very change in its full swing. What most of us fear under NEXT for MBBS is, that how a single standardized exam be maintained all over India! NEXT for MBBS final year must not subside as any other exam that claims a lot but delivers nothing.

It Should Not be a Hurried Implementation: With the proposed implementation time of 3 years, the government will surely be in rush to bring it under the wings of all the concerned Medical colleges / universities. The internal framework should be so strong that hassle-free implementation of the same is assured. As proposed, for now, NEXT for MBBS is scheduled for application three years from the date of NMC Bill getting passed.

Is NEXT Justified?

There has a  lot been contested since the very introduction of NEXT for MBBS. As many believe the exam will prove as nothing but an additional burden on the MBBS final year students. As per an article published by a concerning newspaper agency, the introduction of NEXT for MBBS in the month of December 2017 brought more than 6 colleges in Malabar together protesting against it. This lead to a lot of public chaos.

What is to be largely understood is that how with the application of such a vastly structured test to be spread all over India, how true will it stand to its proposals and in what light will the majority of medical aspirants and practitioners take it.

Here are a few comments as surfaced from Quora concerning NEXT for MBBS and how many are doubting its very implementation.

NEXT (National Exit Test)   What Is NEXT? How And When Will It Be Implemented?

Note: It is important to understand that all these points are just an assumption based on the proposed bill prepared by the Ministry of Health, India, concerning NEXT for MBBS.

For complete official information regarding NEXT for MBBS, medical aspirants can check the Offical Press Release.

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